Wednesday, 19 April 2017

Weekly Wordplay May 1 '17

WORDPLAY post #46
Periodic postings of palindromes, Scramble-Town Maps (creative cartography), binomial phrases, limericks, etc. 

SONGLINK: For those readers who like poetry set to music: You can find lots of singable limerick-medleys and other spoofs on our sister blog "SILLY SONGS and SATIRE", such as this recent post



HOT LINK to the Anagram Sister Cities Initiative - complete collection








HOT LINKS to collections of Classic/Goofy Palindromes #1,#2,#3


HOT LINK: See the entire collection of Magical Palindromes














Monday, 17 April 2017

Wordplay Puzzle #3:The State of MAINE Supports I-M-P-E-A-C-H-M-E-N-T

WORDPLAY post #45
CREATIVE WORDPLAY, involving anagrams
PUZZLE COMPOSED: Giorgio Coniglio, April 2017.


EXPLANATION: CREATIVE CARTOGRAPHY USING ANAGRAMS

The editor has developed a type of anagram-based wordplay that involves the unscrambling of key words, and the availability of unique 2-letter postal abbreviations for each state. This construct has been used, as explained in post #17 and post #33 on this blog, for the development of 'maps' for the key words 'R-E-P-U-B-L-I-C-A-N-S', 'D-E-M-O-C-R-A-T-S', and 'P-A-L-I-N-D-R-O-M-E-S'.  

 






The rules are as follows:

1. Form as many as possible locales which embody all the letters in the KEY WORD. The final two letters of the geographic designation must be a legitimate state postal abbreviation, e.g. ME for Maine.
2. The name of the village or town may include E. (East), N. (North) or Mt. (Mount or Mountain), but no other abbreviations are allowed. 
3. The name of the town or locale must consist of only dictionary-approved words, although these may be creatively combined to simulate actual places, e.g. "Namepitch ME".
4. Constituent words used in the locale (whether combined or separate) must be unique for each state. Thus, if "Namepitch ME"is listed, credit will not be given for "Meanpitch ME" or "Name Pitch ME".
The same constituent words may however be repeated in other states. In the example below, "Hen" appears in the Maine town of Impact Hen ME, and also in the Pennsylvania village of Henmice Mt. PA.  
5. Prizes may be awarded at the site-directors' whim, based on unusual performance.  To compete, record your entry in the Comments Box. (No tweeting, please)

For today's CHALLENGE: HOW MANY TOWNS (FANTASY or REAL)  CAN YOU DERIVE FROM THE LETTERS OF ? .....

I-M-P-E-A-C-H-M-E-N-T 

Hint: Preliminary investigation of this problem showed that the state of Maine (abbreviated ME) was the leading area for this sentiment. 








Scores are based on the total number of locales identified in the 16 relevant states. 

A submission of 25 additional locales 
confirms your status as a WORDPLAY STAFFMEMBER

A submission of 40 additional locales 
confirms your status as a WORDPLAY CABINET SECRETARY.

A submission of 50 additional locales 
confirms your status as a WORDPLAY PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE. 

The RESULTS, including the surprisingly extensive ANSWERS (more than 80 towns nationwide), will be posted in 1 month (the long time allowed for solutions in this case takes into consideration the difficulty of the task). 

STAY TUNED to this Blogpost

Note, in followup May 11... 
No submissions were received for this difficult puzzle as yet. Owing to the relevance of the answers to current pressing issues discussed in today's news, the answer will be posted on a separate blogpost. PLEASE SEE POST #48

Weekly Wordplay Apr 24 '17

WORDPLAY post #44
Periodic postings of palindromes, Scramble-Town Maps (creative cartography), binomial phrases, limericks, etc. 

SONGLINK: For those readers who like poetry set to music: You can find lots of singable limerick-medleys and other spoofs on our sister blog "SILLY SONGS and SATIRE", such as this recent post










HOT LINKS to collections of Classic/Goofy Palindromes #1,#2,#3













Saturday, 15 April 2017

Weekly Wordplay Apr 17 '17

WORDPLAY post #43
Periodic postings of palindromes, Scramble-Town Maps (creative cartography), binomial phrases, limericks, etc. 

SONGLINK: For those readers who like poetry set to music: You can find lots of singable limerick-medleys and other spoofs on our sister blog "SILLY SONGS and SATIRE", such as this recent post








HOT LINKS to collections of Classic/Goofy Palindromes #1,#2,#3
























Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Using PALINDROMES as a SPELLING-AID: True, False and Uncertain

WORDPLAY post #42
ASSESSMENT OF PALINDROMES, specifically those seeming to relate to spelling. Based on the classic palindrome, "No X in Nixon.", such reversible adages seemed worthy of review as to their veracity. 
AUTHOR:  Giorgio Coniglio, March 2017. 

Palindromic phrases and sentences are distinguished by green font.




FACT-CHECKER STATUS: TRUE



No 'D'; no 'L' - Boston; not (sob!) London. 

An 'A', 'B', a 'C', 'A' - cabana.


No 'L' lags - gallon. 

'X 'n 'Y', Lara - lynx

No 'K' in Nixon; No 'X' in Nikon

'X'; 'Y'; no 'Z' - onyx. 

A dog, a person: no 'S' re pagoda

A man, a person: no 'S' re Panama

No 'L' -  a Saxon;  no 'X' - a salon


FACT-CHECKER STATUS: LIKELY TRUE



No 'ROBE' - boron

No 'XI' - Dixon. 

No 'DARN' in radon. 

No 'YARN' in rayon

No 'LEMN' in melon. 

No 'MELN' in lemon. 

No 'LEMON' in "O, melon". 

Not a 'GEM'- megaton. 


FACT-CHECKER STATUS: FALSE



No 'X': - an axon.


No 'E' - eon

No 'XX' - Exxon

No 'X', Al - klaxon. 

No 'D'; no 'L' - London

"No 'I', told Ed - "Lotion.

Not 'L' - I'm Milton

No 'E' - neon

No 'K' in Nikon.  

No 'X' in Nixon


No 'S': rapt parson

No 'S' re person

No 'L' - a salon. 

No 'M', lass. Tin is sin. It's salmon

No 'X' - a Saxon

No 'T'; no 'W' - wonton

No 'T'. Naw! - wanton



FACT-CHECKER STATUS: UNCLEAR


An 'A', 'n' 'A', 'B' - banana

'B'; mock 'K' - comb

'B'; 'M' along - no lamb

A 'C', a 'R', am I  maraca?  

A man, appetite 'P' - Panama. 

No 'E' - Exxon; no 'XXE' - eon. 

No 'H'-typo - python.  

No 'M' lasts. Old lost salmon

Not 'UF' - not on futon


EDITOR'S CONCLUSION: 


Based on the above analysis, palindromes appear to be an inappropriate linguistic mode for confirmation of orthographic truth. In fact, palindromes seem surprisingly misleading in this regard. 

Do you, readers, agree? 









Tuesday, 11 April 2017

Political Wordplay Puzzle #2: The Truth about M-E-N-D-A-C-I-O-U-S

WORDPLAY post #41
CREATIVE WORDPLAY, involving anagrams
PARODY COMPOSED: Giorgio Coniglio, March 2017.


EXPLANATION: 

Several types of wordplay puzzles published in newspapers and magazines involve a type of anagrammatic endeavour - finding constituent shorter words derived from a longer word. Usually a target number is suggested based on the author's experience. 

Our proposal here is to use parent words that are more politically provocative than those targeted in standard puzzles. 

The rules are as follows:

1. Create as many as possible constituent words, having at least 4 letters based on single use of the letters in the PARENT WORD.
2. The letter S may not be used at the end of a short word either to pluralize a noun, or to specify the form of a verb. For example, with target word SEDIMENT, proposed answers may include "Teen", "Need" or "Seen", but not "Teens" or "Needs". 
3. Proper names are not allowed for this specific puzzle. 
4. Prizes may be awarded at the site-directors' whim, based on unusual performance.  To compete, record your entry in the Comments Box. (No tweeting, please)

For today's CHALLENGE: HOW MANY CONSTITUENT WORDS CAN YOU MAKE FROM THE LETTERS OF ? .....


 M-E-N-D-A-C-I-O-U-S 

Hint: 

A submission of 60 words 
confirms your status as a WORDPLAY STAFFMEMBER

A submission of 90 words 
confirms your status as a WORDPLAY CABINET SECRETARY.

A submission of 120 words 
confirms your status as a WORDPLAY PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE. 

The RESULTS, including the surprisingly extensive ANSWERS, (more than 150) will be posted in 1 week. 

STAY TUNED to this Blogpost


ANSWERS (April 18)

Unfortunately, no winners this week.









Classic PALINDROMES P to Z: Plus Giorgio's GOOFIER Variants

WORDPLAY post #40
CREATIVE WORDPLAY, based on "classic" palindromes. This post is a continuation of post #20 and post #29,  alphabetic lists of "classic" palindromes with recently concocted goofier variants. The variants are primarily previously unpublished material compiled by the editor.
EDITED: Giorgio Coniglio, April 2017.


































Saturday, 8 April 2017

Weekly Wordplay Apr 10 '17

WORDPLAY post #39
Periodic postings of palindromes, Scramble-Town Maps (creative cartography), binomial phrases, limericks, etc. 

SONGLINK: For those readers who like poetry set to music: You can find lots of singable limerick-medleys and other spoofs on our sister blog "SILLY SONGS and SATIRE", such as this recent post













HOT LINKS to collections of Classic/Goofy Palindromes #1,#2,#3








HOT LINK to the Anagram Sister Cities Initiative - complete collection




Wednesday, 5 April 2017

Surprisingly High Approval Rates for R-E-P-U-B-L-I-C-A-N-S in Canadian Anagram Locales

WORDPLAY post #38
CREATIVE CARTOGRAPHY and WORDPLAY, derived from post #17.
PARODY COMPOSED: Giorgio Coniglio, March 2016, revised February, 2017.
SONGLINK: On "Giorgio's Ukable Parodies", post #122, a parody-song "Election-Race Anagrams" deals with the distribution of anagrams and political leanings based on the words R-E-P-U-B-L-I-C-A-N-S and D-E-M-O-C-R-A-T-S.














Monday, 3 April 2017

Political Wordplay Puzzle #1: A Wealth of E-M-O-L-U-M-E-N-T-S

WORDPLAY post #37
CREATIVE WORDPLAY, involving anagrams
PARODY COMPOSED: Giorgio Coniglio, March 2017.
SONGLINK: A song honoring E-words ending in -MENT is found at "Giorgio's Ukable Parodies" - The Etymology of Elements

EXPLANATION: 

The target of the present anagrammatic effort, EMOLUMENTS, is an important item discussed in the U.S. Constitution.  

Several types of wordplay puzzles published in newspapers and magazines involve a type of anagrammatic endeavour - finding constituent shorter words derived from a longer word. Usually a target number is suggested based on the author's experience. 

Our proposal here is to use parent words that are more politically provocative than those targeted in standard puzzles. 

The rules are as follows:

1. Create as many as possible constituent words, having at least 4 letters based on single use of the letters in the PARENT WORD.
2. The letter S may not be used at the end of a short word either to pluralize a noun, or to specify the form of a verb. For example, with target word SEDIMENT, proposed answers may include "Teen", "Need" or "Seen", but not "Teens" or "Needs". 
3. Proper names which are universally recognized, e.g. "Obama" may be used, but are subject to the judges' approval. 
4. Prizes may be awarded at the site-directors' whim, based on unusual performance.  To compete, record your entry in the Comments Box. (No tweeting, please)

For today's CHALLENGE: HOW MANY CONSTITUENT WORDS CAN YOU MAKE FROM THE LETTERS OF ? .....


 E-M-O-L-U-M-E-N-T-S 


source: ProPublica









Hint: 

A submission of 40 words 
confirms your status as a WORDPLAY STAFFMEMBER

A submission of 60 words 
confirms your status as a WORDPLAY CABINET SECRETARY.

A submission of 75 words 
confirms your status as a WORDPLAY PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE. 

The RESULTS, including the surprisingly extensive ANSWERS, (more than 100) will be posted in 1 week. 

STAY TUNED to this Blogpost


ANSWERS (April 11)











HATS OFF to J. H. of New York, NY, who obtained a score of 79, and is hereby declared a  WORDPLAY PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE.

Please continue here, for this week's WORDPLAY PUZZLE!